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Controlled-Freeze Technology for Processing Sour-Gas Resources

Topics: H2S/sour gas

A single-step cryogenic-distillation process that removes carbon dioxide (CO2), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), and other impurities from natural gas has been developed by ExxonMobil. Rather than avoiding the freezing of CO2 at cryogenic temperatures, solidification is allowed to take place in a very controlled fashion. The technology has potential to separate CO2 and other impurities from natural gas and to discharge these contaminants as a high-pressure liquid stream.

Introduction

Meeting the demand for natural gas will require new resources. Many of those new resources will contain substantial amounts of CO2 and H2S that must be managed properly at the surface along with the produced hydrocarbons. Returning the CO2 and H2S to the subsurface for geosequestration or for use in enhanced oil recovery is emerging as a preferred option for management and disposal. A controlled-freeze technology can help meet that goal.

This article, written by Senior Technology Editor Dennis Denney, contains highlights of paper IPTC 16848, “The Controlled-Freeze-Zone Technology for the Development of Sour-Gas Resources,” by J.A. Valencia, SPE, and S.D. Kelman, SPE, ExxonMobil Upstream Research, prepared for the 2013 International Petroleum Technology Conference, Beijing, 26–28 March. The paper has not been peer reviewed. Copyright 2013 International Petroleum Technology Conference. Reproduced by permission.
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Controlled-Freeze Technology for Processing Sour-Gas Resources

01 July 2013

Volume: 65 | Issue: 7

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