ADVERTISEMENT

New Steamflooding Techniques Pay Off in Mukhaizna Field

An operator has faced a number of challenges producing heavy oil (8000–20 000 cp) from the Khuff and Kahmah carbonate reservoirs at the Mukhaizna field since their discovery in 2010. The large, low-productivity reservoirs have few analogs in the world, so the operator established new approaches to bring these reserves to market. This paper covers the staged field-development methodology, including analysis and evaluation of various development concepts, that enabled the company to optimize both completion design and artificial-lift selection, reducing downtime and lowering operating costs by nearly 50%.

Introduction

The Mukhaizna field, located in the eastern part of central Oman, was discovered in 1975 by Petroleum Development of Oman. The Kahmah Group consists of shelf carbonate deposits of Cretaceous age, whereas the Khuff formation is of Permian age, with a major unconformity between the lower Kahmah and Khuff formations. The lower Kahmah units are believed to have been either eroded away or not deposited in this area. The Mukhaizna field is relatively close to the Huqf axis in southeastern Oman. The Kahmah and Khuff reservoirs are more representative of the interior of Oman than of either northern or southwestern Oman.

The field structure consists of two structural highs, the North structure and the South structure, separated by a saddle in the middle. The first well was drilled in the Khuff reservoir and proved its productivity. Because the shallower Kahmah B reservoir has even more stock-tank original oil in place, the operator decided to assess its productivity while delineating the reservoir by drilling four wells. These wells were drilled in the northern, middle, and southern areas of the North structure in northeast/southwest and east/west directions to acquire information about the fractures throughout the 20,000-acre field. A coring program was initiated at the same time. The results from the wells and cores helped form the Phase 1 field-development plan.

The two reservoirs have different geological properties. Khuff is highly fractured and has low matrix permeability, whereas Kahmah B is less fractured, has higher permeability, and has been dolomitized to varied levels across the field, which has had a significant effect on production performance.

This article, written by JPT Technology Editor Judy Feder, contains highlights of paper SPE 190478, “Steamflooding Heavy Oil in a Naturally Fractured Carbonate Reservoir in Sultanate of Oman: A Case Study,” by Sanjeev Malik, SPE, Mohammed Al Balushi, SPE, Salim Al Salmi, Aamer Al Belushi, Faris Al Ismali, and Fahad Al Qassabi, Occidental Petroleum, prepared for the 2018 SPE EOR Conference at Oil and Gas West Asia, Muscat, Oman, 26–28 March. The paper has not been peer reviewed.
...
This article is reserved for SPE members and JPT subscribers.
If you would like to continue reading,
please Sign In, JOIN SPE or Subscribe to JPT

New Steamflooding Techniques Pay Off in Mukhaizna Field

01 April 2019

Volume: 71 | Issue: 4

No editorial available

ADVERTISEMENT


STAY CONNECTED

Don't miss out on the latest technology delivered to your email weekly.  Sign up for the JPT newsletter.  If you are not logged in, you will receive a confirmation email that you will need to click on to confirm you want to receive the newsletter.

 

ADVERTISEMENT

No editorial available

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT